Is there a need to educate drivers about the benefits of electric vehicles?

by Bob Sheth on November 17, 2013

Is there a need to educate drivers about the benefits of electric vehicles?

Is there a need to educate drivers about the benefits of electric vehicles?

If we take a look at the electric vehicle market today and compare it with that of just 10 years ago the differences are enormous. This is an industry which has come on in leaps and bounds and while great progress has been made there is still more improvement in the pipeline. We have seen lighter cars introduced, we have seen better battery capacity and we have seen an array of innovative ideas to reduce the costs of running your electric vehicle.

Even though there has been a major increase in the number of electric vehicles sold around the world, is there now a need to educate gasoline/petrol drivers about the benefits of electric vehicles?

Is the message getting across?

In many ways the electric vehicle sector has spent so much time improving technology that it has forgotten to educate the wider driving public about the benefits of this new mode of transport. When we say “new mode of transport” many people will not be aware that electric vehicles have been around in some shape or form for over 100 years!

Quote from ElectricForum.com : “The average driver covers around 70 miles a day through the week which is less than the full charge available on a Nissan Leaf 2013 – about 129 miles on a full charge. How many miles do you drive each day?”

While there is no doubt that drivers of today are more aware of electric vehicles, are they aware of the benefits in the short to medium term and the potentially enormous long-term benefits. Electric vehicle companies seem to pour billions of pounds into manufacturing and advertising when perhaps more of their marketing budget should go towards pure and simple education of the wider public?

It is there, promote it!

One major issue which electric vehicle manufacturers need to overcome is the perceived higher initial investment in electric vehicles compared to their gasoline/petrol counterparts. We have seen a number of innovative ways to get around this issue, leasing battery packs, leasing vehicles and other such incentives but still they are perceived to be more expensive at point of purchase.

If you were to highlight the ongoing saving in fuel, maintenance and durability there is no doubt that more drivers of today would be looking towards the electric vehicle sector. Once companies are able to get over the hurdle of the initial purchase price, which is now starting to fall and will soon be comparable with traditional vehicles, there are some exceptional benefits to be had. Companies also need to highlight the amazing technology associated with electric vehicles, lighter but safer vehicle shells and improved on-board technology to give just a taster. It seems bizarre that having invested billions of dollars into the industry nobody has yet clicked on to that one potential move which could open the floodgates.

Conclusion

Development of the electric vehicle sector has been patchy to say the least with initial focus upon the vehicles themselves, leaving battery power woefully short of investment, and now battery power is catching up, why aren’t EV companies looking to educate the wider driving public?

At some point we will see more educational literature for prospective buyers and we will see more interaction because quite simply, there are more electric vehicles on the road than ever today and people are now starting to ask questions.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: